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Old 06-18-2013, 06:19 AM   #1
Corry
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 45
Default Playing with the cricket

And here is another question How much playing with the cricket do you want?

I observed the following with the first horse I ride in the two-rein. When I started him in the two-rein some months ago he now and then played with the cricket. He played a bit with the cricket when I put the bit in his mouth, when he was thinking and every time I asked for a bit more of collection than he was used to He appeared relaxed and content.

Meanwhile he shows a different behavior. He is almost never playing with the cricket, only when I put the bit in his mouth. When I ride him now I almost never hear him playing with the cricket. But he shows the right amount of saliva, he became much softer in the poll and the whole body. The development is very satisfying. When being ridden he constantly sucks on the bit. It's like he was chewing a chewing gum or having a candy in his mouth. I think he really likes the bit but he is not longer playing with the cricket.

To what extent would one want to hear the music of the cricket?
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:51 PM   #2
DocsMinnieElixer
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Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Minnesota
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I dont know how much you want to hear the cricket,but i notice that my gelding plays with it when I first put the bit in his mouth and moreso when I allow him to rest and are just standing around or walking. He does play with it some when i ask for more collection and thats about it. I dont want one to act like he's bothered by the bit or messing with the bit sonstantly like he's anxious or being neurotic about it, but when they have some time to think or they are pacifying themselves when you are doing something a little different or more difficult I like to hear it. The cricket on my bit isnt a teriby loud obvious one, so I just kep an eye on his expression and the way he works his mouth and I can tell. When we are standing around I can hear it better snd he seems to enjoy occupying himself with it. My mare rolled it a little when it first went into her mouth but you rarely ever heard her roll it around and i think I would have liked to hear it. She was started as a reiner and I think that kind of got to her head in a way that she wanted to stay off the bit and behind it, and keep her mouth quiet. I'm assuming she would expect to be corrected for mouthing the bit too much or something to that extent??
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:07 AM   #3
Rex Easley
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Eastern Oregon
Posts: 57
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Most of my horses, once they learn to pack a spade never hardly roll the cricket. I have found that if you hear the cricket a bunch, the horse is having a hard time holding the bit or cant get suction on it. The only times I hear them roll the cricket is once I put in the bit, anytime I accidently come too fast with my hands, or right after we have been doing heavy work for a long time. They only roll it a couple times and then suck it back up. I think if a spade is balanced right a horse will seldom have a reason to drop it.
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Old 06-19-2013, 11:27 AM   #4
Corry
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 45
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Thank you both for your input.

I wasn't sure whether it was a good sign or not that he reduced the playing with the cricket. What you both wrote makes perfect sense to me and corresponds to what I observe. It seems that we are on the right track. Thank you for your opinions.
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