Classic Horsemanship  

Go Back   Classic Horsemanship > The Classroom > The Hackamore Horse

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-17-2012, 02:49 PM   #1
Rex Easley
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Eastern Oregon
Posts: 57
Default Signal based riding in the Hackamore

Here is how I am trying to use my hackamore nowdays. I use my seat and rein movements verse bumping and pulling the hackamore. I also use very little leg if any. This seems to keep a horse light all day in the hackamore and works really well to get a horse to find the balance point of your body and your hackamore.




Rex Easley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2012, 08:22 PM   #2
Zane Michel
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5
Thumbs up Seat and rein

You have done a nice job
Zane Michel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2012, 10:00 PM   #3
jaya
Foal
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 2
Thumbs up

Do on an you do right! I like it how you are playing with your seat.
Keep the videos comming!
jaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 09:34 AM   #4
Cattleman
Foal
 
Cattleman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 148
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex Easley View Post
Here is how I am trying to use my hackamore nowdays. I use my seat and rein movements verse bumping and pulling the hackamore. I also use very little leg if any. This seems to keep a horse light all day in the hackamore and works really well to get a horse to find the balance point of your body and your hackamore.
I have experimented a little with working more off of my seat then my legs. But have always used doubling and bumping in the hackamore. Was it hard to transition to the thinking of using signals and the balance in your seat? Why did you make the switch? Thanks for sharing your approach, keep the videos coming, your horse looks like it will be a good one.
Cattleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 05:47 PM   #5
Rex Easley
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Eastern Oregon
Posts: 57
Default Hackamore

I have found over the years that long days in the Hackamore created a heavy horse. I new guys when I was a kid that could make them last all day without getting dull. These men understood the California style but could not teach what they were doing. I got with Bruce Sandifer and he was able to explain how things may have been done in hackamore during its early years. I was skeptical but have found these things to be very relevant. Riding a horse with balance and small signals from day one has created the a carriage and a lightness in my horse that i have never felt. I have tons of horse left at the end of the day and I dont have to peddle him home.
Rex Easley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 11:29 PM   #6
FrancisHeritageRanch
Foal
 
FrancisHeritageRanch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Mackay, ID
Posts: 26
Default

This is a very important discipline that is over looked a lot. If you watch the greats it is very hard to tell they are even giving signals because of how subtle their signals are. It takes a lot of saddle time to start to understand how to que with your seat and you can tell Rex has put in these hours. My hat is off to him for his drive to further his horsemanship. A horse and rider working together in harmony is poetry in motion to me. And I share the same passion to advance my horsemanship and it amazes me how just the slightest movement can transmit such a powerful signal or how you sit can affect how your horse walks out.
FrancisHeritageRanch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 03:41 PM   #7
Cattleman
Foal
 
Cattleman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 148
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex Easley View Post
works really well to get a horse to find the balance point of your body and your hackamore.
Rex Easley I have watched these videos a few times, thanks again for taking the time to film them. I think the above quote is one of the keys to what the early vaqueros were doing. They rode there horses with a balance that many people don't understand today. And they used the hackamore in a way that the horse was searching for that balance. This helped when it came time to hang the bridle. The horses were already used to "searching" for that balance and only needed to learn to find it with the spade bit.
Cattleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2012, 07:31 AM   #8
Maverick_73
Foal
 
Maverick_73's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 13
Default Starting a horse

I'm curious Rex--did you start your colt on the hackamore? I know people that have only ridden in one, but the way I'm being taught to start horses is to start them out in the snaffle bit then transition to the hackamore once they get really soft, that way they can understand the direction coming from the reins when they become unsure of what your seat and legs are asking, and use the reins as support. What's yall's opinion?
__________________
"You are not working on the horse, you are working on yourself..." ~ Ray Hunt
Maverick_73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 09:23 AM   #9
Baquero
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 116
Default

One of the things you notice really quickly in these video's are how close together Jeff's hands are when riding. This is key in implementing more signal based riding. Keeping your hands close together like that helps the rider to not "lead the horse from it's back" like many people are taught to do today. This is one of the distinctions to signal based riding, and one of the reasons why the hackamore is crucial in this type of riding. I say riding, because it isn't a style of training it is a different way to ride. Instead of leading from the horse's back you guide them between the reins and then push them forward to where you want them to go, instead of pulling on them. In the end this helps the horse to use more of there hind end to drive, instead of working around on there front as a result of being pulled around all the time.
Baquero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 12:03 PM   #10
Jimmy
Foal
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 157
Default

Well, for those first few rides, Ray Hunt would tell people that they were just leading the horse from his back. The horse at that point understood that. It didn't mean you were pulling on them. The problem is when people go to advance their horse. They just continue to lead from the horses back, and they don't know how to improve things from there. They get their hands and arms all out to the side, out of balance, and things degenerate from there. But I don't know how you are going to get your signals to have meaning in the beginning, unless there is some directing and leading involved a little bit.
Jimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Riding Bridleless Baquero Member Journals/Blogs 7 05-07-2014 08:28 AM
Riding the Spade at Speed Baquero Straight up in the Bridle 1 10-11-2013 12:03 AM
Is it true? Riding with only the alamar knot? Corry Straight up in the Bridle 3 06-02-2013 09:28 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.