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Old 01-07-2012, 01:57 PM   #21
kevinshorses
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Originally Posted by JudyT View Post
Stay away from dog food and espically the cheap kind.Why do you think so many dogs are having cancer now days...

How many dogs ARE getting cancer now days?
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:29 AM   #22
LoriR
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I recently took care of a friend's old gelding. He's 31 and showing ribs and I know the major problem is his teeth. She didn't want to put upwards of $250 into an old horse so has been trying to go the soft foods route. She's been feeding him beet pulp and senior feed. When I got him I added some other things. I started with his usual ration of 8lbs beet pulp (soaked for a couple hours) and 8lbs Sr. feed. I added in some alfalfa/grass pellets that I soaked in warm water briefly because he didn't like them too mushy. I did that because I thought he was getting too much calcium with just the beet pulp. I also upped the protein by adding a "super weight gain" formula with soy meal and pro- and pre-biotics for digestion and also worked up to half a cup of corn oil. I added the new feeds in gradually so not to upset his system. He gobbled everything up.

By the way I found the book "Beyond the Hay Days" by Rex A. Ewing to be most informative. Don't trust your knowledge to trial and error or old cowboy tales.
Lori
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Old 01-11-2012, 09:53 AM   #23
Jane
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The most cost effective way I have found to put weight on a horse is soaked sugar beet pulp and/or linseed oil. There are plenty of conditioning feeds available at my local merchant, but to be honest for the cost of them I find they just don't work as well when I add up how much I have to feed vs cost. If you're employer is already providing good oats then the sugarbeet will help balance out your Calcuim-phosphorous ratio, especially if your horse is in work and doesn't get much time at the hay bar. If your horses hooves and coat are looking a bit weak, maybe add a good vitamin and mineral balancer to his nosebag for about 30 days (or however long it takes to use up a tubful of the stuff) this will help him build up any body stores that may have gotten leached while he was under weight.

Just for the record, I wouldn't feed anything meant for a carnivore for the simple fact that herbivore digestive systems are simply not suitable to process food made for carnivores. Yes there's a good deal of cereal, but its used primarily for a bulking agent and would not be the best quality. Therefore the nutrients would not be as bio-available to your horse. Just my opinion.
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Old 01-21-2012, 05:21 PM   #24
Maddie
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Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
Cheap dog food is a great horse feed when you can get them to eat it.
Kevin I don't mean to be rude but that is wrong in so many ways....mainly because a horse is a grass eating animal with the digestive system of a grass eater.
Feeding them anything which may contain meat meal could be very dangerous. I'm not an expert, but I don't think that is a good idea.
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Old 01-21-2012, 05:30 PM   #25
Maddie
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I wouldn't buy any that have meat in the first two ingredients. The majority of cheap dog food has VERY little meat in it. It may not be cost effective to feed it as it may be cheaped to buy horse feed. I worked for a guy that had a contract to buy all the end run and rejected dog food from a plant. He fed it to horses, cattle and pigs and it fattened them all. He had one horse that he bought from an auction that was very thin and in a very short time that horse was fat and shiny.
Well pigs do eat meat anyway, and I know that some of the cattle feedlots out here (in Australia) were using meat meal, because it makes them bulk up, but thankfully that has been banned now. Cattle trucks pass by on our highway here going to the local saleyards, you could tell if the cattle had meat meal, the trucks stank of the manure. Totally different to a clean cattle smell. I can't see how it could be good for grass eaters. Look, some people will feed anything that's cheap, I know most of us worldwide are feeling the pinch right now, but with horses, I think you have to be just that bit more careful, especially if you value them, and we do, don't we?
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