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Old 11-30-2011, 04:04 PM   #1
Cattleman
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Default What do you use to treat thrush?

It seems each year I have a horse or two that gets some thrush. One of my Appaloosa's was showing signs of it when I trimmed his hooves yesterday. Can't say I didn't expect it, it has been pretty wet around these parts for the last few weeks. I am running low on my Jim Rickens hoof ointment. It has worked well for me in the past, but I thought I would ask around to see what you guys use. What has worked for you?
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Old 12-05-2011, 06:35 PM   #2
Yellowhorse
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I use Thrush Buster... typically it takes just one treatment.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:20 AM   #3
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Thanks for posting up Cattleman, I used to use a supplement but then I got cheap. I now just clean the hooves regularly when I notice thrush forming and use regular iodine on them. It usually clears up pretty quickly.
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:33 PM   #4
Cody Deering
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I use lite bleach water in spray bottle,, doesnt need to be strong, key is to irrigate, squirt hoofs till they run clear.
Also use turpintine, carfull not to get on hairline,, only a temporary irritant.

I was trimming 5 head of horses one time and they were in crappy outdoor pens, they had real bad oily thrush. i came back every 6 weeks for 3 go rounds, still lots of thrush,, owners didnt treat. started into raining,, this was in cental California, came back to trim again, i found horses standing in KNEE DEEP MUD
Much to my supprise,, No Thrush,, the hooves were scoured clean by the deep water and mud.. conclusion,, irrigate hooves with water to help treat thrush.
YES The Organisms are STILL there but they just arnt as populated. every horse no matter the condition has ALL kinds of Micro Organisms on them.
A healthy Hoof Tends not to get infected anyway because the Laminae is SEALED tight (white line ) because an absence of flares and absence of an elongated toe and absence of contracted heels, the outline of the frog is much like a gasket, sealing off hoof eating organisims., any of the ailments listed above "pops" or can break the SEAL of the frog and or create a Stretched white line that ALLOWS the organisms in the inner workings of the hoof.
Most Thrush treatment programs are effective if used till visuall absence of thrush is gone,, most horse owners i deal with only treat once and then they have me only trime 3 times a yr then ask me why there horse still has thrush.

Want VERY QUICK RESULTS ,,just a little more labor, PAK hoof with a product called MAGIC CUSHIN (google it ,,top of search) then shop rag then coflex then duct tape. few days of this with fresh paking daily, u get a prestine hoof
the stuff is SUPPER THICK AND STICKY, leather dust in it helps it pak,
This is good on wounds also it is my Number 1 cure all
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Old 12-13-2011, 02:14 PM   #5
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Coppertox.

A little thrush isn't necessarily bad.
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Old 12-18-2011, 11:12 AM   #6
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Its the cleaning out regularly that does the most good but coppertox and iodine are not a bad idea to help speed up the process.
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Old 12-21-2011, 05:28 AM   #7
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Default Thrush remedy, non-caustic to surrounding live tissues.

I mix a tube of lamisil with a same sized tube of neosporin and pack the mix into a syringe and apply to the infected areas. It treats the fungus and bacteria without damaging live tissues or causing pain if the tissues are infected pretty deep into the collateral groove area or central cleft of the frog. Bleach, iodine and other caustic chemicals can damage living tissues or cause stinging or pain if the infection is deep. You can also use mastitis medication for cattle that come in a syringe at the farm store. Excess sugars in an animals diet feed fungal and bacterial infections. Those sugars can come from over consumption of grasses or from pelleted feeds. Cheers
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:23 PM   #8
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I use the Lysol that comes in the spray bottle. I clean the hooves, spray the Lysol and scrub the frog with a hoof brush, then spray the hoof again with Lysol to rinse away the crud. I have 1 horse that would get thrushy year after year, but once I started doing this he hasn't had it in a couple years. I periodically clean his feet this way just as a maintenance.
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Old 01-21-2012, 05:54 PM   #9
Maddie
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Thumbs up Hoof Care infor from 'down under'

http://www.horsefarrier.com.au/dbrrok.htm
We have a website by David Farmilo who is a master farrier, and even writes for American Farrier magazines. It is really interesting and full of good information if you'd like to check it out sometime.
As the old saying goes..."NO FOOT NO HORSE"
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Old 02-10-2012, 10:59 AM   #10
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Lots of great advice here! The appaloosa that showed signs of thrush is now doing much better. It is a horse that I wouldn't trade for in a million years. It was given to me 12 years ago. Today I would pay whatever it takes for this horse, he is one of those one in a million just all around great horses. He is now 25, has had a great life, and I hope continues to have a great life. He still loves to work and I turn to him often to get jobs done. But when it comes to his nutrition and overall help he definitely requires special attention. And I feel it is my duty after all these years to take the time to do it right. I owe it to him, I went out and bought another bottle of Jim Rickens hoof ointment, its really great stuff. After cleaning his hoofs, applying the ointment, and a few of the suggestions here. After a week his hooves were looking great!
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