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Old 09-30-2012, 08:10 PM   #1
Cattleman
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Default Beet Pulp

I have a two year old that I just took in for training. She is a little underweight and with winter coming I probably won't have the grass to be able to build her up. I was looking at my options and a read a bit about beet pulp. Is this something you would feed to a young horse? To supplement the alfalfa I am already feeding her? How much would you feed a young horse? I probably won't be doing much more then ground work with her for the next few weeks and then start doing light riding towards the end of this month. What do you reccomend? What has been your experience, do you buy shredded or pellets? How long do you soak them before feeding? Do you put it on top of the hay or feed separately?
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:46 AM   #2
MikeF
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Default Re: Beet Pulp

Not sure about the sugar content in beet pulp, might cause problems with laminitis...
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:03 PM   #3
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There is Beet Pulp with and without molasses. If you decide to use it, try to get the w/o kind. Otherwise, a horse without metabolic issues (shouldn't be dealing with this in a young horse anyway) shouldn't have a problem with the sugar content of either. I like to rinse it good though because some BP has a lot of dirt in it. Not all. Standlee Hay Products has good BP. I prefer the shreds and I soak as little as 10 minutes with warm water or 30 mins with cold. I use it to add weight along with stabilized rice bran. Just be sure you keep your calcium phosphorous ratio where it needs to be esp. for a growing horse.

The other thing that I like to use is a good digestive enyzme, Yea Sacc by Alltech is a good one and inexpensive.

Best wishes!
Kathy
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:46 PM   #4
flyingcollie
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We used to include beet pulp in the ration mix in the feedlot. I never heard of anyone feeding it to horses . . . we used to have several sugar factories in the valley, and the pulp was cheap and plentiful then.

You don't want to top feed that colt, getting it on a "sugar high" for training, do you ? You want to supplement the feed with higher fat content. Our vet recommended rice bran for a starved "rescue" we took in last fall. She's still hard keep, but the rice bran keeps good weight on her.
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:51 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingcollie View Post
We used to include beet pulp in the ration mix in the feedlot. I never heard of anyone feeding it to horses . . . we used to have several sugar factories in the valley, and the pulp was cheap and plentiful then.

You don't want to top feed that colt, getting it on a "sugar high" for training, do you ? You want to supplement the feed with higher fat content. Our vet recommended rice bran for a starved "rescue" we took in last fall. She's still hard keep, but the rice bran keeps good weight on her.
This definitely isn't a horse that I am worried about being on a sugar high. It is too mellow for my liking at this point. We are bringing the life up in her though, she is coming along well.

Where do you get rice bran?
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:06 AM   #6
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I'd expect any full-service feed store to have it. Purina and other package feed makers have it either as meal "fines" or a pelletized in a couple of different "flavors" depending if you want to supplement vitamins, trace minerals, etc.

I well understand how "low" a starved horse can be. That rescue mare I mentioned was so thin, you could'a played a marimba solo on her ribs, and she certainly was "mellow". Actually, she was so dull, she acted as if she didn't care what you did with her, or to her. Once fed up slick, she had plenty of "spark" and could be quite a handful, without feeding "hot". High carbs and sugar just burns off in nervous energy, and can make 'em a little dingy, seems to me.

Think the difference between feeding a kid good, well-balanced meals to build muscle and bone, as opposed to a diet of candy-bars and caffeine. I'll be surprised if you don't see some fire and spunk in this kid once she gets some weight on ! Good luck !
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Old 10-08-2012, 09:30 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by flyingcollie View Post
I'd expect any full-service feed store to have it. Purina and other package feed makers have it either as meal "fines" or a pelletized in a couple of different "flavors" depending if you want to supplement vitamins, trace minerals, etc.

I well understand how "low" a starved horse can be. That rescue mare I mentioned was so thin, you could'a played a marimba solo on her ribs, and she certainly was "mellow". Actually, she was so dull, she acted as if she didn't care what you did with her, or to her. Once fed up slick, she had plenty of "spark" and could be quite a handful, without feeding "hot". High carbs and sugar just burns off in nervous energy, and can make 'em a little dingy, seems to me.

Think the difference between feeding a kid good, well-balanced meals to build muscle and bone, as opposed to a diet of candy-bars and caffeine. I'll be surprised if you don't see some fire and spunk in this kid once she gets some weight on ! Good luck !
Just to clarify, this isn't a "rescue horse" this is just a 2 year old filly that I took in on training. The horse is underweight, but not by a ton. You can't see any ribs, but she is thin. She needs to put on some weight and build some muscle, but I don't want to stress her out too much because she is only 2 years old. She still has time to grow.
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:55 PM   #8
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Thin is fine for a two year old. No ribs showing, she's prolly doing OK on the feed regimen she's on. Pour on a little more grub, if her weight comes up a bit then you'll know where to balance. Goes without saying growing colts need good nutritious feed, salt and trace minerals.

Blinded by my own "project" critter, when yer a hammer every problem is a nail!
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Old 10-08-2012, 02:22 PM   #9
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I agree thin is ok for a two year old, this horse is two and a half, and I was looking at other options to supplement the feed she is already on, with hay prices going up. This is generally one of the reasons why I don't work horses until they are 3. This filly is on some quality alfalfa (3-4 leaves/day) and has access to a salt/mineral block. My thinking is that I will add a little (1.2 lbs) beet pulp to the alfalfa she is already being fed.
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:14 PM   #10
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Around here, we've always tended to make a distinction between "good alfalfa hay" (dairy grade, or for feeders) and "horse hay", i.e., a lower protein grass mix. If cost is the big factor, consider you may pay less $$ for hay that's more appropriate for equines anyway.

If you haven't already, check out the University of Colorado's veterinary equine website. It will give you good guidelines for balanced rations for young horses. Horses grow 'til they're five . . . at two and a half, she's still getting some height, so will likely continue to look "slim" until she begins to fill out.

The feed geniuses (like Purina) have all this figured out in their package feeds, but of course we pay a lot more for pellets, cubes and supplements than the standing price of hay . . . your county ag agent should be able to run analysis on any hay you buy, and those fancy feed bags pretty much tell you what's in those various "tailored" rations.

The bad news is, what with the severe drought in the midwest and $200 a ton hay going into fall, there just ain't gonna be any "cheap" way to feed our critters this winter. I'd talk you out of the beet pulp if I could, but that's just intuitive on my part. More research is indicated . . . one of the reasons I wanted to access a forum such as this . . . you can always learn sumpin' valuable !

"The eye of the master fattens the cattle . . . "
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