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Old 10-22-2013, 04:24 PM   #11
Mares Tales
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Never underestimate the power of a jinglebob.
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:12 AM   #12
Corry
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Never underestimate the power of a jinglebob.
I've never used spurs with jinglebobs so far. I'm wondering whether I should try those. What difference do they make in your experience?
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:41 AM   #13
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The jinglebob makes a little noise when your leg moves.

The horse starts reponding to the sound of the jinglebob BEFORE one comes in with the spur.

It is nice to have a horse that responds to the preparation.
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Old 10-24-2013, 12:17 PM   #14
Corry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mares Tales View Post
The jinglebob makes a little noise when your leg moves.

The horse starts reponding to the sound of the jinglebob BEFORE one comes in with the spur.

It is nice to have a horse that responds to the preparation.
So jinglebobs kind of amplify leg cues without pressure? Sounds obvious.

On the other hand, don't they make a continuos noise due to the movement of the horse? I wonder whether a continous, rhythmic jingle makes the horse dull in the long run?
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Old 10-24-2013, 08:03 PM   #15
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Hi Corry,

I see that you are from Germany, and maybe had a few dressage or jumping lessons. If you learned how to apply a half halt, the half halt is a signal to the horse that he should be on notice that a request is coming.

The sound of the jinglebob is a bit like that, it is a call to notice.

Quiet legs "still" unnecessary noise but then, the horse seems to separate what noise is backround noise and........ noise with the addition of the "life in the riders body" that means something.
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Old 10-25-2013, 03:55 AM   #16
Corry
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Hi Mares Tales,

Thank you very much for your answer. Now I got an idea. I really have to try jinglebobs.

Happy trails
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Old 10-26-2013, 04:52 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mares Tales View Post
The jinglebob makes a little noise when your leg moves.

The horse starts reponding to the sound of the jinglebob BEFORE one comes in with the spur.

It is nice to have a horse that responds to the preparation.
This is the idea behind the ringing of the rowel as well. I have a hard time distinguishing the jingle bob from the normal ringing they make while bouncing when riding and when I want to make them as a pre-signal. Not saying it can't be done, just saying I have a difficult time with it. I heard an old timer once say that the Vaquero's didn't use verbal cues when training horses. I have often wondered if they used the heel chains on there spurs, jingle bobs, and curb chains as a means to create cadence and "verbal cues' in their horses.
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:21 AM   #18
Jimmy
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Once I'm pretty sure I'm not going to get bucked off, I wear spurs on all my horses. They are kind of crappy puny spurs at that. One day I will buy myself a nicer pair. It interesting that in FEI Dressage rules, at the upper levels, spurs are mandatory. It is a part of the horse accepting the aids.
That being said, I do not like pushing a horse around with a spur, or pressing them off, and that sort of thing, although that is a common method. I think of leg aids as creating an impulse. You say your leg comes first. Yes, that is true. But it is important to recognize that before the leg comes other actions, such as your pelvis, or the action of your reins.
I am trying to train myself to think beyond just getting a horse to yield to pressure, or increasing pressure until he responds. The pressure/release deal can end up being a trap. It will always end up being backed up with more pressure, until it it used as a threat, instead of a trained conditioned response.There is what I am calling associative impulses. One action, position, attitude, consistently applied, creates a habit of response. Habits are self rewarding, in general. I think of the spur as energizing my leg, and my body. They hardly have to really touch the horse, once the horse is aware of what they are. But the action of your leg begins in the rest of your body, so sometimes there is action before even the leg is applied. If you want lightness, be aware of those things. Once you have to go directly to a spur, you've missed a whole other language. Of course, sometimes that is necessary. But it better light them on fire.
The European model was to use the touch of a whip to generate energy. Again, it is associative. Otherwise, you would have to raise welts.
But pretty hard to help at a branding carrying a whip and a rope in one hand!
On a broke horse, not wearing a spur seems like going out on a rainy day without a hat.
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Old 10-30-2013, 03:00 AM   #19
Corry
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Hi Jimmy,

I like very much how you describe the idea of how to use spurs.

There is one sentence in your post I don't understand due to shortcomings in my English since I'm from Germany. May I ask you to explain what you mean by "Otherwise, you would have to raise welts."?

Thank you--and all the others in this forum--for sharing your insights. It's so inspiring,

Corry
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Old 10-30-2013, 09:15 AM   #20
Jimmy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corry View Post
Hi Jimmy,

I like very much how you describe the idea of how to use spurs.

There is one sentence in your post I don't understand due to shortcomings in my English since I'm from Germany. May I ask you to explain what you mean by "Otherwise, you would have to raise welts."?

Thank you--and all the others in this forum--for sharing your insights. It's so inspiring,

Corry
I simply meant that the whip, like the spur, is to help aid in creating an impulse or energy. The horse can respond to just the touch of it, and not to the sheer force of it. If you used it wrong, you would be hitting the horse hard enough eventually to make marks (welts) on the horse's side.
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