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Old 11-09-2012, 07:45 AM   #1
flyingcollie
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Default What about shoes ?

Maybe this is the wrong "department" ? Shoes ain't necessarily "tack" . . .

I've got shoes on my mind this morning, it snowed in the valley overnight, and more is predicted for today and tomorrow, when we're bringing the cows back from the hills.

Anyone have any thoughts about winter shoeing ? A lot of riders I know claim a rim shoe or "Scotch sole" is better than a shoe with calks, because the whole surface of the shoe is on the ground if the surface is hard, like pavement, ice, rock, or frozen ground . . . others believe the usual three-calk shoe makes for better traction, same way as a traction tire is better than a highway tread on rough ground . . . still others believe barefoot is best for winter.

Last winter, I rode on rim shoes with borium calks added in three spots in the usual pattern, and was mighty impressed with how positive the footing seemed for my pony. Beyond that, the stuff wore like diamond . . . we re set them three times, and into the spring, it seemed really good on rock and pavement as well.
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Old 11-09-2012, 01:11 PM   #2
Jimmy
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All or any of the above, depending on the kind of conditions. Don't forget about ice nails. They can be removed when the conditions change.
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:37 PM   #3
Cattleman
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The majority of my horses are barefoot during the winter. But I have a few that I will keep shod if I am going to be riding them over rougher terrain to keep there feet good. A lot of it depends on the hoof of the horse, some of mine would be fine without a shoe. Others get real soft during the winter and if I were to ride them I would put shoes on them. Any of the methods you mentioned would work for you. I generally just put the usual three-calk shoe on them. Do you plan on riding a lot after bringing the cows home? It snowed a few inches here today as well.
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Old 11-10-2012, 06:24 PM   #4
flyingcollie
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There's always a big gap between what I plan to do, and what gets done
I've got a "deal" with an indoor arena to ride at least once a week through the winter, the "excuse" being to keep my wife in the saddle, and "maintain" her 9 yr old mare. The obligation to keep that regular appointment is a godsend !

I plan to ride as much as I can through the winter . . . so conditions will be at the whim of the weatherman.

Today's cattle drive started off in the six inches or so that fell in the hills yesterday . . . it was snowing not hard, but steadily as we wound our way 18 miles down and out of the summer range. My pony learned to walk on "high heels", snow would ball up nearly six inches before breaking loose. With a fresh breeze up, and riding into the wind, 26F felt like -26 . . . but we made the shipping pens in daylight, and it was a good ride.
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:02 PM   #5
MikeF
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Default shoeing

I have a question regarding shoeing. I have been studying barefoot trimming for several years and feel I'm fairly knowledgeable about barefoot and rehab practices, but I do not know much about shoeing practices, except that some horses could benefit from wearing shoes in certain situations and conditions. The few farriers I've encountered seem barely educated about the anatomy and function of the horse hoof. Could someone please direct me to books/videos of respectable members of the profession?
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:04 PM   #6
flyingcollie
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Mike, it almost sounds as if your mind is made up that shoes are unnecessary. if you have a horse with hard dense hooves (they're never white) who tracks perfectly straight, and never has to go off arena sand, or soft turf, or he doesn't get rode much, then shoes are unnecessary. If you ride trails over all kinds of terrain and rocks, on pavement occasionally, and more than an hour or two a week, better be shod.

It's true there are a lot of guys out there cold hammering shoes and tacking 'em on as well as they can, but there are also a lot of exceptional craftsmen. Start with the webpage of the American Farriers' Assn., then contact folks in your area who are really serious about performance horses, and go and see what kind of job the farriers they use are doing, and if it meets your standards.

There are a few major schools like Oklahoma Farriers College who turn out certified craftsmen. Their courses are founded on understanding how horses move, and on their anatomy.
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Old 11-11-2012, 11:33 PM   #7
Travis Morgan Horseshoein
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Barefoot "experts" tend to get all their education from youtube, Strasser, or that other idiot, and tend to choose ideology over common sense. Having a horse sore for six months isn't a "transition", it's cruelty.
I'm sick to death of hearing about how shoers just want to sell shoes. We make more money and hurt less at the end of the day if all we do is trims. One set of shoes take us three to four times as long as a trim, and that's IF we don't have to do anything special, we're cold fitting them, and the shoes are easy to fit.
Also, I'm pretty sure the Phonecians and Egyptians that pioneered horse shoeing weren't worried with marketing. Can you imagine hammering out a hipposandal with no forge, using a rock, with no steel tools? I'm betting their horses were just sore and they were trying to help.
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Old 11-12-2012, 08:03 AM   #8
flyingcollie
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I have nothing but respect for the guys who have done my shoeing over the years. I learned how to shoe, and have done it a few times out of necessity, but I know I don't want to work that hard, and it's just foolish, when it takes me four times as long to shoe a horse as it does someone who's a good hand at it.

I've had farriers who were mighty knowledgeable about a horse's way of going, and making corrections for the best. I've never known one who wouldn't go out of his way if the situation warranted, and all were as dependable as the sunrise.

Travis, I note you mention cold fitting. For forty years, I never saw shoes hot-set, 'til I got on with the kid who shoes for me now. I hadn't seen that since I was really small, watching the blacksmith in town do work horses. I'd like to know your thoughts on this . . . I've had good shoers, but this fellow does the cleanest work I've ever seen.
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Old 11-12-2012, 08:13 AM   #9
Travis Morgan Horseshoein
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I prefer hot fitting. It makes a lot of things a lot easier. It also seems to combat thrush and white line disease.

In addition, since I've got the forge anyhow, it's no big deal to draw clips, roll or rocker a toe, run a fuller through the heels to make them wider, rather than banging out a trailer that hangs up on stuff, etc.. I also have the ability to make any special shoe I need a lot faster than driving back to town or ordering it.


And chicks dig it.
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Old 11-12-2012, 09:09 AM   #10
Jimmy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Morgan Horseshoein View Post
I prefer hot fitting. It makes a lot of things a lot easier. It also seems to combat thrush and white line disease.

In addition, since I've got the forge anyhow, it's no big deal to draw clips, roll or rocker a toe, run a fuller through the heels to make them wider, rather than banging out a trailer that hangs up on stuff, etc.. I also have the ability to make any special shoe I need a lot faster than driving back to town or ordering it.


And chicks dig it.
Awesome answer! The chick part!
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